48 results found

  • Sir Henry - Short Stories | hrfoundation

    Sir Henry - Short Stories The Foundation's Historian , has written a set of 10 short stories covering important aspects of Sir Henry's life. David's research is, as always, meticulous. We hope you enjoy this series. David Neely 1. 2. His Early Years Career 1877 to 1897 3. Sir Henry's Statue 4. Sir Henry's Motto 5. The Schneider Trophy 6. His Portrait 7. Baronetcy 8. Coats of Arms 9. The Memorial Window 10. His Funeral ​ ​

  • Contact Us | hrfoundation

    Contact Us THE SIR HENRY ROYCE FOUNDATION Email: enquiries@henryroycefoundation.com . : Australian Head Office Bill Allsep House, 3/18 Laser Drive Rowville, Victoria Australia Lionel Gell School of Instruction , Rowville, Victoria, Australia The SHRF Geebung Museum 475 Newman Road, Geebung. Queensland 4034 - click to email the Geebung Curator HERE The SHRF Coolum Showroom 52 Lysaght Street, Coolum, Queensland 4573 - click to email the Coolum Curator HERE Send Success! Message received.

  • More About 2 | hrfoundation

    Establishment of the Foundation (cont....) The Sir Henry Royce Foundation Australia was initiated when David Ekberg, a Member of the Victoria Branch of the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club of Australia (RROCA), having been impressed with what the Sir Henry Royce Memorial Foundation had achieved in the UK, conceived the idea of forming a similar organisation in Australia. David promoted the idea of an Australian foundation to the RROCA Federal Council, where David Vann was the then Federal President. David Vann and Ian Dunn (Federal Secretary) tirelessly pursued David Ekberg’s idea and approached Malcolm Johns, an Honorary Life Member of the RROCA to advise on how such a foundation could be formed. At the Federal Rally of the RROCA in Wollongong on the 28th April 1996 it was agreed that “an irrevocable Trust for charitable purposes be established” and that it be called “The Sir Henry Royce Foundation Australia”. The founding trustees were David C Jones AM OBE (Chairman), James C Kelso and David G Vann OAM. The inaugural Trustees then invited Malcolm N Johns to be the fourth Trustee. Over time, there have been changes in the people serving as a Trustee. David Jones retired and David Vann became Chairman. David Neely and David Davis were appointed as Trustees. Russell Rolls was appointed as a Trustee. David Davis, Malcolm Johns and David Neely retired. David Vann retired as Chairman but remained a Trustee with Russell Rolls taking over as Chairman. Frank Carroll, Brian Crump and Eric Henderson were appointed as Trustees. David Vann retired as a Trustee. Jeanne Eve was appointed a Trustee. The current Trustees are; Russell Rolls (Chairman), Frank Carroll, Brian Crump, Jeanne Eve, Eric Henderson and Wallace Morehouse. The Trust Deed states: “The charitable objects of The Foundation are the advancement of the science and technology of mechanical engineering for public benefit and the advancement of education.” It went on to state that “The collection policy is to collect, document and exhibit any objects whatsoever illustrating or connected with the science of mechanical engineering and especially related to the work of Sir Henry Royce.” “The Collection is to include such items as: The published and unpublished records of experiments, research and work of the late Sir Henry Royce, Any objects whatsoever illustrating or connected with the science of mechanical engineering as it relates to Sir Henry Royce, Those items that illustrate the activities associated with motor car manufacture, sale and distribution.” The Foundation was officially launched on the 1st October 1999 at a meeting of interested supporters at the Fox Classic Car Museum in Melbourne at which there was a gallery displaying cars, engines, motors, models, photographs, memorabilia and related items by then collected and assembled by the Trustees. Until The Foundation was able to establish its own premises, many years later, much of the collection was on public display at the Fox Museum. There was a steady growth in donated funds, artifacts and memorabilia that forms the basis of the present collection. The Foundation found support from established organisations such as the Museums Victoria and the Australian War Memorial who loaned historic Rolls-Royce aero engines for display. As an indication of the confidence placed in The Foundation for the preservation of the Australian heritage of Rolls-Royce, the two ex-Australian Government “royal” Phantom V limousines have been donated to The Foundation by separate donors. In 2010, following a very generous donation from Jean Allsep, The Foundation was able to purchase a substantial building at Rowville (an outer suburb of Melbourne) in which The Foundation’s collection is now housed. These premises, Bill Allsep House (BAH), are named after Jean’s late husband, Bill, a long-time, enthusiastic Member of the Victoria Branch of the RROCA. Under the terms of a legal agreement between The Foundation and the Victoria Branch of the RROCA, the Branch has the use of Bill Allsep House as their club rooms with the day-to-day costs of occupancy being met by the Branch. In 2014, following a very generous donation from Lionel Gell (a long-standing Member of the Victoria Branch of the RROCA), a second property was acquired nearby in Rowville. These premises, the Lionel Gell School of Instruction for Rolls-Royce and Bentley (LGSI), have been set up with car hoists, benches and workshop facilities specifically to accord with the educational objectives of The Foundation – to promulgate the engineering ethos of Sir Henry Royce and his successors to a wider community. LGSI is used, in part, by the Technical Section of the RROCA Victoria Branch for regular seminars. The Foundation’s archival records collection is housed in Bill Allsep House and is maintained by Gilbert Ralph, The Foundation’s Honorary Archivist and a group of dedicated volunteers. This archival collection ranges from books, magazines, brochures, RROCA and Branch historical documentation to service records from Australian Rolls-Royce and Bentley dealers. Further, The Foundation has a collection of over 20,000 photographic images documenting the history of the Club, the cars and the Company in Australia. This is a valuable resource for Club Members and for wider historical research. The Foundation also houses the archival collection from the Australian Chapter of the 20 Ghost Club. Australia is a vast country with population centres thousands of kilometres apart in different States. As the main Archives of the Sir Henry Royce Foundation are housed in Melbourne Victoria, it was decided that two Sub-Archives be established in Queensland; one a museum and the other a showroom. In Brisbane, items with special Queensland provenance are housed along with any copies of archival material from Melbourne and is the Geebung Museum. In Coolum, the large new premises is the showroom for the larger aero and ‘C‘ series Diesel engines as well as the second ex vice - regal Phantom V. Details of all Queensland catalogued items are forwarded to the Archivist for the central database of the SHRF. All items are subject to the same archival and cataloguing policies and procedures as the main SHRF Archive. The SHRF has legal ownership of all the material under the care of the curator of the Geebung and Coolum premises, but all these materials will remain in Queensland for display as the core Sub-Archives, Queensland. ​ The Geebung Museum was opened on 2 June 2018 with Frank Carroll, Russell Rolls and Curator, Barry Sparks, giving the opening address. The doors were officially opened by Queensland MP Bart Mellish. It has five rooms of books and technical displays, various engines displayed in the front showroom, the Royce room, the Bentley room, tools and equipment and a TV room plus several bookshelves and cabinets of memorabilia. Car clubs and other interest groups regularly visit. ​ The Coolum Showroom of the Foundation was officially opened on 17 November 2018 by Federal MP Ted O’Brien. It contains 620 square metres of air-conditioned displays including 5 notable Rolls-Royce engines (including a 1945 Merlin aero engine), 340 model cars, archives, books and 7 very special Rolls-Royce and Bentley motor cars. It is open to the public (in normal times, without pandemic) on the first Saturday of each month, 7am to 10am, in conjunction with “Sunshine Coast Cars n Coffee” plus other times, by appointment, for car clubs and other special interest groups. The Sir Henry Royce Foundation Australia is now an important element of the worldwide movement to preserve the historical artifacts and documentation relating to the engineering ethos of Sir Henry Royce and to the Rolls-Royce and Bentley marques. The Foundation’s collection includes historically important aircraft engines, ex Australia Government “royal” Phantom Vs and an extensive archive of printed material and photographs, primarily related to Australian topics. The educational objective of The Foundation is served by the collection being open to all.

  • Sir Henry Royce Foundation

    The Sir Henry Royce Foundation The evolving role of Henry Royce engineering Enter Site

  • Donating Items | hrfoundation

    Donating of Items & Bequests "When sorting out your stuff and clutter; This is for the SHRF, you mutter." ​ The Foundation is a not for profit, registered charity so is financed entirely by donations and cash or in kind. It is exempt from paying tax. All donations in cash over $2 are tax deductible and receipts are issued for tax purposes. Donations in kind must satisfy the Foundation’s Collection policy. If tax deductibility is sought, it must be valued by an approved valuer abiding by the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program. All donations are recorded in permanent records held by the Foundation. The Chairman of Trustees acknowledges these donations by letter. In the case of major donations, the Foundation will provide documentation entitled ‘Deed of Gift’. Any person or corporation can contribute to the Foundation and all amounts and items are much appreciated. There are several ways you can donate; Donating memorabilia and items related to Royce and his engineering career Our archivist would be happy to receive original records and histories of Rolls-Royce and Bentley vehicles, service handbooks, photographs, books and publications, drawings and diagrams, manuals, RROC-A program, mementos, souvenirs, artworks and more. Larger items such as engines related to Royce i.e. aero, steam or crane are also desired. If you wish to donate item(s), please download this form . If you are require more information about the suitability of your donation or have further questions, please email enquiries@henryroycefoundation.com Donation checklist for you to consider: Can you describe the item? Do you know to whom it relates? Are there any stories related to it? Where did you get it? If you have multiple items, can you describe the number or volume of the material? ​ Donating money direct to the Foundation Donations above $2 are tax deductible. Please download this form. You are able to make a once off donation of any size or donate an amount per year or for several years. Or simply complete via our PayPal link: Planning a Bequest in your Will You may wish to give a Bequest to the Foundation and will need to inform your solicitor or trustee company. If you have already a Will, you can add a codicil- a short legal amendment and again seek advice from your solicitor. Please note the full name is Sir Henry Royce Foundation ARBN 080511253 for your Solicitor. Download this information page Free of all duties and the receipt from the Chairman of the Foundation shall be a complete and sufficient discharge for the Executor(s). ​ Establishing a legacy If you or your family would like to establish a legacy in recognition or memory of a loved one, we would encourage you to contact us to discuss the opportunity of titled research awards or scholarships. Please contact us via email to discuss, enquiries@henryroycefoundation.com ​ Frequently asked questions What happens to the material I donate? Items accepted into the Foundation will be assessed and housed in specialist, secure storage, in accordance with the Foundation's collection documentation and preservation policies. The principal archives and collection is housed in Melbourne in either the Bill Allsep House or Lionel Gell School of Instruction. Sub - archives are also in Brisbane for Queensland donations or for duplicated items. If there are several copies of a donated item within the Foundation’s collection e.g. publications, then the Foundation may sell them. The same applies to a donated vehicle or car body if it is duplicated or of non-archival importance. How can I get my memorabilia to the Foundation? The archivist will advise you the best way for its transport. It may be posted, delivered or collected depending on the size and weight. Will my donation go on display? The Foundation will endeavour to display donated items with a descriptive label and name of donor where appropriate. Can the Foundation provide a valuation for my items? The Sir Henry Royce Foundation cannot provide valuations of your items. As a registered Charity, the SHRF abides by the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts program. Your donated item will need to be valued by an approved expert valuer in the relevant field. The SHRF can assist you with commencing this process. ​Does the Memorial buy items? The Sir Henry Royce Foundation does not purchase material for its collection. Valuation of Museum Items For a tax deduction to be available on items donated to The Foundation, such items must be valued, independently, by two valuers nominated by the Australia Taxation Office. It is important to note that these valuations are undertaken against the background of the Federal Government’s Cultural Gifts Program and take into account the “cultural value” of the item as well as its “commercial value”. It is the policy of the Trustees that The Foundation carries the donated item as an asset in the Balance Sheet at the valuation determined by the Australian Taxation Office under the Cultural Gifts Program. This policy reflects the fact that The Foundation is a registered charitable foundation whose objectives include, inter alia, “the advancement of the science and technology of mechanical engineering for public benefit and the advancement of education”. Further, these objectives note that “the collection policy is to collect, document and exhibit objects especially related to the work of Sir Henry Royce”. It is entirely appropriate; therefore, that The Foundation’s assets are formally valued at a “cultural valuation” rather than a “commercial valuation”. This policy meets with the approval of The Foundation’s Honorary Auditor. Privacy Policy Please to download the SHRF Privacy Policy. click here SHRF - Supporting the Foundation (Margaret & Barrie Gillings) Play Video Supporting the Foundation Watch Now Share Whole Channel This Video Facebook Twitter Pinterest Tumblr Copy Link Link Copied Share Channel Info Close

  • Coolum Showroom - QLD | hrfoundation

    Coolum Showroom - QLD The SHRF Coolum Showroom 52 Lysaght Street, Coolum, Queensland 4573 - click to email the Curator HERE Second vice-regal Rolls-Royce Phantom V housed in Queensland at Coolum Showroom. In 2017, the SHRF was donated a second vice-regal 1967 Rolls-Royce Phantom V chassis number 5VF155, again bearing its original registration number Coolum Showroom ZSF 570. The photography of this beautiful car has been provided by Brian Carson, taken at the 61st Rally of the Rolls Royce Owners’ Club in May 2019 at Jimbour Homestead. The Coolum Showroom of the Foundation was officially opened on 17 November 2018 by Federal MP Ted O’Brien. It contains 620 square metres of air-conditioned displays including 5 notable Rolls-Royce engines (including a 1945 Merlin aero engine), 340 model cars, archives, books and 7 very special Rolls-Royce and Bentley motor cars. Right next door is Carroll's Transport Depot which displays another 25 vintage and collectable motor cars, all in fine condition with details on display. These collections are open to the public (in normal times, without pandemic) on the first Saturday of each month, 7am to 10am, in conjunction with “Sunshine Coast Cars n Coffee” plus other times, by appointment, for car clubs and other special interest groups. ​ ​ QLD Branch Phantom V Trustee RROCA-QLD R-R Phantom V Chassis: 5VF155 Rego: ZSF-570 QLD Branch Phantom V Trustee RROCA-QLD R-R Phantom V Chassis: 5VF155 Rego: ZSF-570 QLD Branch Phantom V Trustee RROCA-QLD R-R Phantom V Chassis: 5VF155 Rego: ZSF-570 1/11 FB60 1964 Rolls-Royce FB60 petrol engine powering the BMC Vanden Plas Princess 4-door saloon (Pinafarina) Bentley 4 1/2 Litre engine from a Mark VI. FB60 1964 Rolls-Royce FB60 petrol engine powering the BMC Vanden Plas Princess 4-door saloon (Pinafarina) 1/21

  • News | hrfoundation

    News & Announcements Article in the Coolum Advertiser - 3rd October 2019 Opening of the Lionel Gell School of Instruction for Rolls-Royce and Bentley Owners

  • Aero Engines | hrfoundation

    Aero Engines Rolls-Royce “Eagle” Aero Engine (photos below) A piston engine in a twelve-cylinder 60° Vee configuration (V12) of 20.3 litres capacity. Each cylinder is separate with its water jacket fabricated from steel pressings and welded in place. Each cylinder has two valves, inlet and exhaust, actuated by an overhead camshaft on each bank of six cylinders. The initial output of this engine was 225 horsepower increasing to 350hp in the ‘Eagle 81’. This was Henry Royce’s first aero-engine, and took only six months from drawing board to initial test. A feature of this engine is the beautiful epicyclic reduction gear drive to the propeller. This type of reduction gear was later incorporated by Mr Royce in the engines of the Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Silver Ghost and New Phantom (Phantom I) motor cars. Two Rolls-Royce Eagle engines powered Alcock and Brown’s Vickers Vimy biplane (a converted bomber) which made the first direct crossing of the Atlantic in 1919; and Ross and Keith Smith’s Vimy, in which the Australian brothers, also in 1919, accomplished the first flight from England to Australia within a specified time limit of 30 days or less. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Rolls-Royce “Merlin” Aero Engine (photos below) A piston engine in a twelve-cylinder 60 Vee configuration (V12) of 27 litres capacity with two banks of six cylinders. Each bank carried an overhead camshaft driven by skew gears from the wheel case at the rear. Each cylinder has four valves, two inlet and two exhaust. Initial output was 625hp, which increased to over 2000hp in later versions largely due to improvements in supercharging. This famous engine powered Britain’s World War II front-line fighters, the Supermarine Spitfire and Hawker Hurricane, in the decisive 1940 Battle of Britain. It was also used in the Avro Lancaster and de Havilland D.H.98 Mosquito during WW2. The Merlin was a direct descendant of the R engine, which was developed by Rolls-Royce as a private venture without Government funding and powered the Schneider Trophy-winning Supermarine S.6 and S.6B racing seaplanes in 1929 and 1931 respectively. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ In addition, here is a YouTube video "Guy Martin Builds a Spitfire MK.1. This video is 1hr and 12min https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7Zebpu2nS4&feature=youtu.be Rolls-Royce "Derwent" Jet Engine (photos below) The Derwent was the second jet engine manufactured by Rolls-Royce. The Welland was the first, developed in association with jet propulsion pioneer (Sir) Frank Whittle. The Derwent was first fitted to the twin-engine Gloster Meteor in 1944. Early Derwents produced 2000lb thrust; later versions delivered 3600lb thrust at 14,700rpm. A Meteor powered by two Derwent V turbojets broke the World Air Speed record; first at 606mph (975kph) in 1945 and in 1946 at 616mph (990kph). The Welland and Derwent headed a long line of highly successful Rolls-Royce jet engines, which included the celebrated Avon, Conway, RB.211 and Trent. ​ Rolls-Royce "Avon" Jet Engine (photos below) Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation Pty Ltd (CAC), owned by a consortium of Australian companies and Rolls-Royce Ltd, manufactured this engine in the 1950s in Melbourne. The engine type was fitted to the English-Electric Canberra twin-engine bomber manufactured under licence by the Government Aircraft Factories (GAF) in Fishermans Bend, Melbourne for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). Later versions were used in the CAC-built Avon Sabre jet fighter for the RAAF. This aircraft was a more powerful development of the North American F-86 Sabre. A total of 218 Avon engines was manufactured by CAC, and a further 1,704 overhauls were undertaken for the RAAF. CAC had a long association with Rolls-Royce, having built 108 Merlins (plus spares) and 112 Nene jet engines in Australia. Nicholas and Richard Knight presented this engine to the Foundation in recognition of the contribution of Herbert H. Knight to the aircraft industry in Australia and his role in bringing aircraft manufacture to Australia. Herbert Knight commenced his career in the aircraft industry at Westland Aircraft in Somerset, England in 1928. He was at CAC from 1937 until 1969, serving as General Manager and a Director for the last nine years of his career. ** Click on the photos below to view the full gallery of photos. ** Below the photo gallery are a few short videos on Aero Engines. ​ Rolls-Royce “Eagle” Aero Engine The "Eagle" engine is kindly on loan from Museum Victoria. www.museumvictoria.com.au Rolls-Royce "Avon" Jet Engine Rolls-Royce “Eagle” Aero Engine The "Eagle" engine is kindly on loan from Museum Victoria. www.museumvictoria.com.au 1/10 SHRF - Avon engine (R Rolls) Play Video SHRF - Derwent engine (R Rolls) Play Video SHRF - Eagle Engine (as told by Russell Rolls) Play Video SHRF - Merlin Restoration (as told by Bryan Harper) Play Video Aero Engines Watch Now SHRF - Derwent engine (R Rolls) Play Video Share Whole Channel This Video Facebook Twitter Pinterest Tumblr Copy Link Link Copied Share Channel Info Close

  • Model Cars | hrfoundation

    Model Cars Visitors to the SHRF’s home, Bill Allsep House, will admire the unique models of a and a car on display amongst the Foundation‘s collection. These two 2-metre-long models are the work of one man – the late Claude Mason. Large Model Cars in the Collection (photos below) Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost 20hp An outstanding feature of the Ninth Federal Rally at Mildura in June 1967 was the unveiling of a 2m-long driveable model of a 1922 Rolls-Royce 20hp which had been built by Claude Mason over a period of a couple of years. Apart from the 198cc horizontally-opposed, water-cooled engine, Claude manufactured most of the other components including the chassis, wheels, axles, differential, steering and the body work. Even the tool kit is made to scale. The attention to detail must be seen to be believed. In retirement Claude continued working on another model: a 1907 Silver Ghost which was the centre of attention when unveiled at the Formal Dinner at the 1971 Federal Rally at Shepparton. The Silver Ghost model, which has a Master Pup single-cylinder two-stroke engine No P746, is heavier and more complex than the 20hp. To enable these model cars to be driven by adults, Claude hinged the front seats in such a manner that they fold back to allow enough leg room to operate the control pedals. The steering is said to be light and direct. Whilst each car has a gear lever it appears that the levers are more for show than functionality. Both models are outstanding examples of a skilled artisan’s craftsmanship. Claude was a capable pattern maker, and his skill as a toolmaker, moulder, machinist, metal worker, electrician, carpenter, upholsterer and painter are self-evident. He executed most of the work in his own well-equipped workshop at Coburg. When finished he proudly displayed the fruits of his extraordinary talents in the lounge room of his home in Bell Street, Coburg. After his death Claude’s family kindly offered the two cars to the Sir Henry Royce Foundation on permanent loan for display at the Fox Museum and subsequently at Bill Allsep House. ​ Small Model Cars in the Collection (photos below) The SHRF has been fortunate over the years to accept donations from Members, or their estates, which add to the story of Sir Henry Royce and Rolls-Royce and Bentley motor cars. Several of these donations have included model cars, of varying scales, which the benefactors have collected over the years. Below are examples of three of these collections which are now on display at Bill Allsep House in Melbourne. ​ ​ ** Click on the photos below to view the full gallery of photos. Miscellaneous Models 1922 Rolls-Royce 20hp Built by Claude Mason Model 10HP car, 1905. Franklin Mint 1/24 SHRF - Claude Mason model (as told by John Reis) Play Video Claude Mason Scale Model Watch Now Share Whole Channel This Video Facebook Twitter Pinterest Tumblr Copy Link Link Copied Share Channel Info Close

  • Information | hrfoundation

    Information We hope our website provides you with a variety of information on not just the Sir Henry Royce Foundation in Australia, but other items, photos, articles and documents of interest connected to the English engineer and car designer. We hope you enjoy the site. Sir Frederick Henry Royce Born: 27 March 1863 Died: 22 April 1933 ​ OBE - awarded in 1918 Baronet of Seaton in the County of Rutland - created in 1930 for services to British Aviation Married: Minnie Punt in 1893 - separated in 1912 Sir Henry had no children ​ Royce lived by the motto "Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble"

© 2018 by The Sir Henry Royce Foundation. 

Fostering the engineering excellence of Sir Henry Royce into the 21st century