27 results found

  • Geebung Museum - QLD | hrfoundation

    Geebung Museum - QLD The SHRF Geebung Museum 475 Newman Road, Geebung. Queensland 4034 - click to email the Curator HERE Due to COVID-19 restrictions we are still unable to offer large group gatherings. However, individuals and smaller groups are most welcome. We are open every Saturday afternoon from 12 Noon till 4.00pm or by arrangement. Australia is a vast country with population centres thousands of kilometres apart in different States. As the main Archives of the Sir Henry Royce Foundation are housed in Melbourne Victoria, it was decided that Sub-Archives be established in Queensland. In Brisbane, items with special Queensland provenance will be housed along with any copies of archival material from Melbourne. Details of all Queensland catalogued items are forwarded to the Archivist for the central database of the SHRF. All items are subject to the same archival and cataloguing policies and procedures as the main SHRF Archive. The SHRF has legal ownership of all the material under the care of the curator of the Geebung premises, but all these materials will remain in Queensland for display as the core Sub-Archive, Queensland. The Geebung Museum was opened on 2 June 2018 with Frank Carroll, Russell Rolls and Curator, Barry Sparks, giving the opening address. The doors were officially opened by Queensland MP Bart Mellish. It has five rooms of books and technical displays, various engines displayed in the front showroom, the Royce room, the Bentley room, tools and equipment and a TV room plus several bookshelves and cabinets of memorabilia. Car clubs and other interest groups regularly visit. Geebung Museum ​ You will find below a selection of photos from the Museum. Below that is a short video tour of the Museum. Enjoy! 1969 Rolls-Royce V8 Engine. Located at Geebung Museum. The Royce Room Spitfire Avenue 1948 Bentley Mk VI Engine. Located at Geebung Museum. 1/16

  • Coolum Showroom - QLD | hrfoundation

    Coolum Showroom - QLD The SHRF Coolum Showroom 52 Lysaght Street, Coolum, Queensland 4573 - click to email the Curator HERE The Coolum Showroom is open every first Saturday of the month, in conjunction with Sunshine Coast Cars & Coffee, centred upon the German Bakehouse next door, plus other times for groups by appointment. Second vice-regal Rolls-Royce Phantom V housed in Queensland at Coolum Showroom. In 2017, the SHRF was donated a second vice-regal 1967 Rolls-Royce Phantom V chassis number 5VF155, again bearing its original registration number Coolum Showroom ZSF 570. The photography of this beautiful car has been provided by Brian Carson, taken at the 61st Rally of the Rolls Royce Owners’ Club in May 2019 at Jimbour Homestead. The Coolum Showroom of the Foundation was officially opened on 17 November 2018 by Federal MP Ted O’Brien. It contains 620 square metres of air-conditioned displays including 5 notable Rolls-Royce engines (including a 1945 Merlin aero engine), 340 model cars, archives, books and 7 very special Rolls-Royce and Bentley motor cars. Right next door is Carroll's Transport Depot which displays another 25 vintage and collectable motor cars, all in fine condition with details on display. These collections are open to the public (in normal times, without pandemic) on the first Saturday of each month, 7am to 10am, in conjunction with “Sunshine Coast Cars n Coffee” plus other times, by appointment, for car clubs and other special interest groups. ​ ​ QLD Branch Phantom V Trustee RROCA-QLD R-R Phantom V Chassis: 5VF155 Rego: ZSF-570 QLD Branch Phantom V Trustee RROCA-QLD R-R Phantom V Chassis: 5VF155 Rego: ZSF-570 QLD Branch Phantom V Trustee RROCA-QLD R-R Phantom V Chassis: 5VF155 Rego: ZSF-570 1/11 Rolls-Royce Avon engine, Mark 26, Serial number 3435 on loan for display from the Queensland Air Museum. Bentley 4 1/2 Litre engine from a Mark VI. Rolls-Royce Avon engine, Mark 26, Serial number 3435 on loan for display from the Queensland Air Museum. 1/25

  • About | hrfoundation

    About the Foundation In all his designs Sir Henry Royce (1863-1933) demonstrated an attention to detail never previously seen in the automotive and aeronautical worlds. His motto was his engineering standard: Quidvis recte factum quamvis humile præclarum (Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble). ‘Rightly done’ are the key words in the Rolls-Royce ethos, and there are many fine examples of Royce’s determination to strive for perfection. He was also guided by the philosophy: ‘Strive for perfection in everything you do. Take the best that exists and make it better. When it does not exist, design it.’ The Inspiration Establishment of the Foundation The Sir Henry Royce Foundation was created from a discussion at the 1995 Federal Rally of the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club of Australia. It was proposed that a stand-alone body be created to preserve the heritage of the past in relation to items manufactured by Rolls-Royce and Bentley, the history of the Founders (Sir Henry Royce, The Hon C.S. Rolls and W.O. Bentley), and all printed material relating to the Company’s automobiles and aircraft engines. It all started when David Ekberg..... . click here for full story The Objects of the Foundation The Charitable Objects of the Foundation are for the advancement of the science and technology of mechanical engineering for the public benefit and the advancement of education in such ways as the Trustees in their absolute discretion think fit, including:Making available for study and research purposes the corpus of the published and unpublished work of the late Sir Henry Royce and by promoting and providing facilities for such study and research and for the study of the history and development of the pursuit of excellence in the science of mechanical engineering; .... Click to read more The Strategic Outlook of the Foundation The Charitable Objects of the Foundation include: “The advancement of the science and technology of mechanical engineering for the public benefit; and the advancement of education”. In particular, The Foundation seeks to promote the engineering ideals of Sir Henry Royce. To view the Strategic Outlook of the Foundation please visit: Foundation Strategic Outlook ​ Opening of the Lionel Gell School of Instruction for Rolls-Royce and Bentley Owners ​ Policies Collection Policy Conservation / Preservation Policy SHRF - The Foundation (as told by Russell Rolls) Play Video The Foundation Watch Now Share Whole Channel This Video Facebook Twitter Pinterest Tumblr Copy Link Link Copied Share Channel Info Close

  • Online Newsletter | hrfoundation

    The Royce Voice SHRF Quarterly e-Newsletter ​ Welcome to the Foundation's quarterly e-news from all its Archives in Australia. We wish to let you know about the latest events and acquisitions within the various Collections, Museum and Showroom. Also to update you about its community involvement and various Awards. We'd love to have you as a subscriber.

  • Photo Gallery | hrfoundation

    Photo Gallery These photos are a just a tiny selection from our extensive archives. ​ ** Click on the photos below to view the full gallery of photos. 5VF159 Showing 5VF159 registration ZSF-571 is "progressing through Bacchus Marsh, with the King of Nepal". Photo courtesy of COMCAR DC Electric Motor, one of 3 salvaged from a travelling crane at Marfleet & Weight. Made by Royce & Co of Manchester. 5VF155 Taken during the visit of the King of Nepal in 1971 is 5VF155 with registration ZSF-570. Note the Crown above the number plate is covered. Photo courtesy of National Archives of Australia 1/10

  • Sir Henry Royce Foundation

    The Sir Henry Royce Foundation The evolving role of Henry Royce engineering Enter Site

  • Donating Items | hrfoundation

    Donating of Items & Bequests "When sorting out your stuff and clutter; This is for the SHRF, you mutter." ​ The Foundation is a not for profit, registered charity so is financed entirely by donations and cash or in kind. It is exempt from paying tax. All donations in cash over $2 are tax deductible and receipts are issued for tax purposes. Donations in kind must satisfy the Foundation’s Collection policy. If tax deductibility is sought, it must be valued by an approved valuer abiding by the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program. All donations are recorded in permanent records held by the Foundation. The Chairman of Trustees acknowledges these donations by letter. In the case of major donations, the Foundation will provide documentation entitled ‘Deed of Gift’. Any person or corporation can contribute to the Foundation and all amounts and items are much appreciated. There are several ways you can donate; Donating memorabilia and items related to Royce and his engineering career Our archivist would be happy to receive original records and histories of Rolls-Royce and Bentley vehicles, service handbooks, photographs, books and publications, drawings and diagrams, manuals, RROC-A program, mementos, souvenirs, artworks and more. Larger items such as engines related to Royce i.e. aero, steam or crane are also desired. If you wish to donate item(s), please download this form . If you are require more information about the suitability of your donation or have further questions, please email enquiries@henryroycefoundation.com Donation checklist for you to consider: Can you describe the item? Do you know to whom it relates? Are there any stories related to it? Where did you get it? If you have multiple items, can you describe the number or volume of the material? ​ Donating money direct to the Foundation Donations above $2 are tax deductible. Please download this form. You are able to make a once off donation of any size or donate an amount per year or for several years. Or simply complete via our PayPal link: Planning a Bequest in your Will You may wish to give a Bequest to the Foundation and will need to inform your solicitor or trustee company. If you have already a Will, you can add a codicil- a short legal amendment and again seek advice from your solicitor. Please note the full name is Sir Henry Royce Foundation ARBN 080511253 for your Solicitor. Download this information page Free of all duties and the receipt from the Chairman of the Foundation shall be a complete and sufficient discharge for the Executor(s). ​ Establishing a legacy If you or your family would like to establish a legacy in recognition or memory of a loved one, we would encourage you to contact us to discuss the opportunity of titled research awards or scholarships. Please contact us via email to discuss, enquiries@henryroycefoundation.com ​ Frequently asked questions What happens to the material I donate? Items accepted into the Foundation will be assessed and housed in specialist, secure storage, in accordance with the Foundation's collection documentation and preservation policies. The principal archives and collection is housed in Melbourne in either the Bill Allsep House or Lionel Gell School of Instruction. Sub - archives are also in Brisbane for Queensland donations or for duplicated items. If there are several copies of a donated item within the Foundation’s collection e.g. publications, then the Foundation may sell them. The same applies to a donated vehicle or car body if it is duplicated or of non-archival importance. How can I get my memorabilia to the Foundation? The archivist will advise you the best way for its transport. It may be posted, delivered or collected depending on the size and weight. Will my donation go on display? The Foundation will endeavour to display donated items with a descriptive label and name of donor where appropriate. Can the Foundation provide a valuation for my items? The Sir Henry Royce Foundation cannot provide valuations of your items. As a registered Charity, the SHRF abides by the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts program. Your donated item will need to be valued by an approved expert valuer in the relevant field. The SHRF can assist you with commencing this process. ​Does the Memorial buy items? The Sir Henry Royce Foundation does not purchase material for its collection. Valuation of Museum Items For a tax deduction to be available on items donated to The Foundation, such items must be valued, independently, by two valuers nominated by the Australia Taxation Office. It is important to note that these valuations are undertaken against the background of the Federal Government’s Cultural Gifts Program and take into account the “cultural value” of the item as well as its “commercial value”. It is the policy of the Trustees that The Foundation carries the donated item as an asset in the Balance Sheet at the valuation determined by the Australian Taxation Office under the Cultural Gifts Program. This policy reflects the fact that The Foundation is a registered charitable foundation whose objectives include, inter alia, “the advancement of the science and technology of mechanical engineering for public benefit and the advancement of education”. Further, these objectives note that “the collection policy is to collect, document and exhibit objects especially related to the work of Sir Henry Royce”. It is entirely appropriate; therefore, that The Foundation’s assets are formally valued at a “cultural valuation” rather than a “commercial valuation”. This policy meets with the approval of The Foundation’s Honorary Auditor. Privacy Policy Please to download the SHRF Privacy Policy. click here SHRF - Supporting the Foundation (Margaret & Barrie Gillings) Play Video Supporting the Foundation Watch Now Share Whole Channel This Video Facebook Twitter Pinterest Tumblr Copy Link Link Copied Share Channel Info Close

  • More About 2 | hrfoundation

    Establishment of the Foundation (cont....) The Sir Henry Royce Foundation Australia was initiated when David Ekberg, a Member of the Victoria Branch of the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club of Australia (RROCA), having been impressed with what the Sir Henry Royce Memorial Foundation had achieved in the UK, conceived the idea of forming a similar organisation in Australia. David promoted the idea of an Australian foundation to the RROCA Federal Council, where David Vann was the then Federal President. David Vann and Ian Dunn (Federal Secretary) tirelessly pursued David Ekberg’s idea and approached Malcolm Johns, an Honorary Life Member of the RROCA to advise on how such a foundation could be formed. At the Federal Rally of the RROCA in Wollongong on the 28th April 1996 it was agreed that “an irrevocable Trust for charitable purposes be established” and that it be called “The Sir Henry Royce Foundation Australia”. The founding trustees were David C Jones AM OBE (Chairman), James C Kelso and David G Vann OAM. The inaugural Trustees then invited Malcolm N Johns to be the fourth Trustee. Over time, there have been changes in the people serving as a Trustee. David Jones retired and David Vann became Chairman. David Neely and David Davis were appointed as Trustees. Russell Rolls was appointed as a Trustee. David Davis, Malcolm Johns and David Neely retired. David Vann retired as Chairman but remained a Trustee with Russell Rolls taking over as Chairman. Frank Carroll, Brian Crump and Eric Henderson were appointed as Trustees. David Vann retired as a Trustee. Jeanne Eve was appointed a Trustee. The current Trustees are; Russell Rolls (Chairman), Frank Carroll, Brian Crump, Jeanne Eve, Eric Henderson and Wallace Morehouse. The Trust Deed states: “The charitable objects of The Foundation are the advancement of the science and technology of mechanical engineering for public benefit and the advancement of education.” It went on to state that “The collection policy is to collect, document and exhibit any objects whatsoever illustrating or connected with the science of mechanical engineering and especially related to the work of Sir Henry Royce.” “The Collection is to include such items as: The published and unpublished records of experiments, research and work of the late Sir Henry Royce, Any objects whatsoever illustrating or connected with the science of mechanical engineering as it relates to Sir Henry Royce, Those items that illustrate the activities associated with motor car manufacture, sale and distribution.” The Foundation was officially launched on the 1st October 1999 at a meeting of interested supporters at the Fox Classic Car Museum in Melbourne at which there was a gallery displaying cars, engines, motors, models, photographs, memorabilia and related items by then collected and assembled by the Trustees. Until The Foundation was able to establish its own premises, many years later, much of the collection was on public display at the Fox Museum. There was a steady growth in donated funds, artifacts and memorabilia that forms the basis of the present collection. The Foundation found support from established organisations such as the Museums Victoria and the Australian War Memorial who loaned historic Rolls-Royce aero engines for display. As an indication of the confidence placed in The Foundation for the preservation of the Australian heritage of Rolls-Royce, the two ex-Australian Government “royal” Phantom V limousines have been donated to The Foundation by separate donors. In 2010, following a very generous donation from Jean Allsep, The Foundation was able to purchase a substantial building at Rowville (an outer suburb of Melbourne) in which The Foundation’s collection is now housed. These premises, Bill Allsep House (BAH), are named after Jean’s late husband, Bill, a long-time, enthusiastic Member of the Victoria Branch of the RROCA. Under the terms of a legal agreement between The Foundation and the Victoria Branch of the RROCA, the Branch has the use of Bill Allsep House as their club rooms with the day-to-day costs of occupancy being met by the Branch. In 2014, following a very generous donation from Lionel Gell (a long-standing Member of the Victoria Branch of the RROCA), a second property was acquired nearby in Rowville. These premises, the Lionel Gell School of Instruction for Rolls-Royce and Bentley (LGSI), have been set up with car hoists, benches and workshop facilities specifically to accord with the educational objectives of The Foundation – to promulgate the engineering ethos of Sir Henry Royce and his successors to a wider community. LGSI is used, in part, by the Technical Section of the RROCA Victoria Branch for regular seminars. The Foundation’s archival records collection is housed in Bill Allsep House and is maintained by Gilbert Ralph, The Foundation’s Honorary Archivist and a group of dedicated volunteers. This archival collection ranges from books, magazines, brochures, RROCA and Branch historical documentation to service records from Australian Rolls-Royce and Bentley dealers. Further, The Foundation has a collection of over 20,000 photographic images documenting the history of the Club, the cars and the Company in Australia. This is a valuable resource for Club Members and for wider historical research. The Foundation also houses the archival collection from the Australian Chapter of the 20 Ghost Club. Australia is a vast country with population centres thousands of kilometres apart in different States. As the main Archives of the Sir Henry Royce Foundation are housed in Melbourne Victoria, it was decided that two Sub-Archives be established in Queensland; one a museum and the other a showroom. In Brisbane, items with special Queensland provenance are housed along with any copies of archival material from Melbourne and is the Geebung Museum. In Coolum, the large new premises is the showroom for the larger aero and ‘C‘ series Diesel engines as well as the second ex vice - regal Phantom V. Details of all Queensland catalogued items are forwarded to the Archivist for the central database of the SHRF. All items are subject to the same archival and cataloguing policies and procedures as the main SHRF Archive. The SHRF has legal ownership of all the material under the care of the curator of the Geebung and Coolum premises, but all these materials will remain in Queensland for display as the core Sub-Archives, Queensland. ​ The Geebung Museum was opened on 2 June 2018 with Frank Carroll, Russell Rolls and Curator, Barry Sparks, giving the opening address. The doors were officially opened by Queensland MP Bart Mellish. It has five rooms of books and technical displays, various engines displayed in the front showroom, the Royce room, the Bentley room, tools and equipment and a TV room plus several bookshelves and cabinets of memorabilia. Car clubs and other interest groups regularly visit. ​ The Coolum Showroom of the Foundation was officially opened on 17 November 2018 by Federal MP Ted O’Brien. It contains 620 square metres of air-conditioned displays including 5 notable Rolls-Royce engines (including a 1945 Merlin aero engine), 340 model cars, archives, books and 7 very special Rolls-Royce and Bentley motor cars. It is open to the public (in normal times, without pandemic) on the first Saturday of each month, 7am to 10am, in conjunction with “Sunshine Coast Cars n Coffee” plus other times, by appointment, for car clubs and other special interest groups. The Sir Henry Royce Foundation Australia is now an important element of the worldwide movement to preserve the historical artifacts and documentation relating to the engineering ethos of Sir Henry Royce and to the Rolls-Royce and Bentley marques. The Foundation’s collection includes historically important aircraft engines, ex Australia Government “royal” Phantom Vs and an extensive archive of printed material and photographs, primarily related to Australian topics. The educational objective of The Foundation is served by the collection being open to all.

  • Sir Henry Royce | hrfoundation

    Sir Henry Royce Frederick Henry Royce was born in Alwalton, Huntingdonshire, near Peterborough, the son of James and Mary Royce and was the youngest of their five children. Some readers may know very little about Sir Henry. Others would know quite a lot about him. But it is worth recording again some of his history and, by extension, that of Rolls-Royce. Frederick Henry Royce was born on 27 March 1863. Not into a wealthy family, but as the son of a miller. Commencing work as a telegram delivery boy, he was later apprenticed to the Great Northern Railway. Royce was interested in electricity, and developed his knowledge of this industry at night school. He formed F. H. Royce and Co. in 1884 when he was twenty-one. That Company manufactured dynamos and electric cranes; parts of one of the latter were acquired by the Foundation. ​ In 1903 Royce bought a small Decauville car manufactured in France, and set about improving it to his standards. This led to the production of a 10hp, 2-cylinder automobile he named ‘Royce’, which first ran on 1 April 1904. Two more cars of the same type and specifications were produced, and of the three, only the engine of one remains in the Manchester Museum. ​ The Honourable Charles Stewart Rolls met Frederick Henry Royce (as he then was) in May 1904. Rolls, a pioneer motorist and car salesman, was impressed with Royce and his car, so they subsequently formed Rolls-Royce Limited in April 1906. The first 40/50hp, 6-cylinder car – a model retrospectively known as the ‘Silver Ghost’ after the most famous example of the type – made its appearance in November 1906, and with many improvements in its design, was produced for the next nineteen years. At the outbreak of the First World War, Sir Henry turned his energies to aero engines, and a long line of superb aero engines was begun. First came the Eagle, then the Hawk, followed by the Falcon and Condor. More than half of the Allied aircraft in that war flew with Rolls-Royce engines, all designed by Sir Henry. Nearly seven months after the war ended, John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown in a Vickers Vimy biplane fitted with two Rolls-Royce Eagle engines completed the first aerial crossing of the Atlantic. Subsequently, the Kestrel aero engine was produced, which in turn led to the ‘R’ engine for the 1931 Schneider Trophy races, and ultimately, the Merlin V-12 powerplant based on the design of the ‘R’ engine. In all his designs Sir Henry Royce demonstrated an attention to detail never previously seen in the automotive and aeronautical worlds. His work ethic was inspired by his personal motto: Quidvis recte factum quamvis humile præclarum (Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble). Today, there are many fine examples of Royce’s determination to strive for perfection in engineering. The principal objective of the Sir Henry Royce Foundation, Australia is to honour Sir Henry's life and work, to publicise, preserve and maintain examples of his engineering genius, and perpetuate his engineering philosophy, namely the pursuit of excellence. He was named Baronet Royce of Seaton (Rutland) on June 26, 1930. The barontcy became extinct when he died. In 1962 a memorial window dedicated to his memory was unveiled in Westminster Abbey the only time an engineer has been honored in this way. Click on the audio link below to listen to a very interesting 12 minute audio on Sir Henry from the Grace Gibson radio series 'Famous Fortunes’. This enjoyable series can be obtained through their website ( ). Well worth listening to. The Foundation is grateful and acknowledges the permission granted by Grace Gibson Productions to bring you this audio classic. www.gracegibsonradio.com Famous Fortunes - Episode 19 00:00 / 00:00 SHRF - Sir Henry Royce (as told by Russell Rolls) Play Video Sir Henry Royce Watch Now Share Whole Channel This Video Facebook Twitter Pinterest Tumblr Copy Link Link Copied Share Channel Info Close

  • Car Collection Specifications | hrfoundation

    Car Collection - Detailed Specifications 1967 Rolls-Royce Phantom V Chassis number 5VF159 Ordered by Australian Federal Governmen Ceremonial transport for Governor-General, Royalty, Heads of State, and visiting dignitaries V8 engine, 6.2 litre Lower than normal compression ratio of 8:1 instead of 9:1 Weight: unladen 2710 kgs or 5962 lbs 'colonial model' = extra 13 litres of fuel or 2 UK gallons of fuel for longer distances = 'oil-bath' filters instead of paper filters for the air filters due to Australian dust Drum brakes Lap sash seat belts only in front seats Queen sits behind driver so her seat is adjustable height and forwards length for max viewing. Blue light car, 3 flag poles, crest holder Rear seats have bone coloured Connolly leather. Not so in front. Detective sat in passenger front seat. Driver's seat is for chauffeur- non adjustable as glass partition immediately behind. Pink silk blinds on rear windows for privacy when required. Intercom system for rear passenger and driver. Fittings for heraldic shield on roof Mulliner Park Ward body 2 dickey seats in rear Cocktail cabinet with crystal cut sherry glasses and silver capped decanters. Not armour plated as Queen expressly requested not to be. Small velcro tape on dashboard--thought to be when Royal family visited, they could attach their St Christopher medal-patron saint of safe travel---true or false ?? 1983 - Federal Government sold off this car at a Sydney auction because it was not bullet-proof and was only doing low mileage. Replaced by Australian built Holdens and Fords. Prime Minister Keating was in power. - Purchased by John Matheson & Jeanne Eve in Sydney for private use. 1995 - Driven across the Nullabor to WA for a Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club annual rally. 1997 - Participated and completed the Peking to Paris Motor Challenge with John Matheson & Jeanne Eve. Afterwards was repainted with some panel beating to its original glory. 1997 - Donated to the Sir Henry Royce Foundation, Australia. 2000

© 2018 by The Sir Henry Royce Foundation. 

Fostering the engineering excellence of Sir Henry Royce into the 21st century